jnco jeans 

Starting out as a textile brand that soon morphed into a globally successful fashion and home-furnishing label, its fan base numbered artists and fashion icons who represented progressive values, from the glamorous Jackie Kennedy, who snapped up seven Marimekko dresses, to artist Georgia O

The Saree Room receives most of its orders from mens jeans women between the ages 18-34, and a growing number of customers  about 18%  are from outside the south Asian community. Kassam notices that young south Asian people in North America are reviving vintage vibes with printed saris, a best-seller at her brand. As a young girl, Kassam recalls walking into her grandmother's closet and dressing up in her old floral saris. "I love the simplicity of wearing a printed sari. They are truly a timeless piece we can pass on to future generations," says Kassam."It's finally nice to see so much representation, and have the younger generation be proud of their heritage. Social media has given south Asian women a great platform to express their culture like never before," she adds. 

From its beginnings 70 ripped jeans years ago, the brand stood for free-spirited bohemianism and bold confidence. Dominic Lutyens tells the story of a trailblazing Finnish phenomenon.Marimekko, the Finnish brand famed for its fabrics printed with splashy, outsized motifs, arose just as Finland was regaining its autonomy and forging a new jnco jeans national identity in the postwar years. It clearly expressed optimism but a little-known fact about the label is its bohemian pedigree. Starting out as a textile brand that soon morphed into a globally successful fashion and home-furnishing label, its fan base numbered artists and fashion icons who represented progressive values, from the glamorous Jackie Kennedy, who snapped up seven Marimekko dresses, to artist Georgia O Keeffe.

Ratia cherished her rural roots  a major influence on Marimekko. "A lot of prints have rustic, Slavic, rustic motifs  a throwback boyfriend jeans to Armi's upbringing near Russia," says Borrelli-Persson. But these folksy prints didn't look traditional, rendered as they were in silhouette, in a modern, graphic way. The brand was often equated with nature and freedom: in one 1960s photo, a clothed model stands in a forest, oblivious to a naked woman running behind her.

Accordingly, Ratia and Eskolin-Nurmesniemi arrived in Cambridge with cardboard boxes filled with dresses and fabrics. The Marimekko frocks  referred to at the time as liberating both body and mind  proved a hit with students at Radcliffe College, the former Harvard University all-women's college. "Hundreds of Radcliffe girls took the dresses home to their mothers," reported fashion editor Eugenia Sheppard at the time. She also described the label as "a uniform for intellectuals", adding that "Marimekko is for women whose way of wearing clothes is to forget what they have on".

The dress reform movement  part of an early feminist movement in the West  promoted "rational dress" and railed against the Victorian fashion for crinolines, high waisted jeans bustles, padded busts, wasp-waisted dresses and constricting corsetry that both hampered movement and was deemed harmful to health. Dress reformers championed simplified garments for activities such as bicycling or swimming.

Marimekko was extensively promoted in the US by DR, which opened shops in New York and San Francisco in 1963 and 1964 respectively. Both stocked Marimekko fabrics and clothing popular with its forward-thinking customers. By the 1970s, Marimekko was stocked by 50 retailers in the US. Crate Barrel, the US chain of homeware shops, which opened its first store in Chicago high waisted jeans in the then-bohemian neighbourhood of Old Town, sold Marimekko fabrics from 1965.


ZaraKennan

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